Available Summaries

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Summary Ofsort iconAuthored ByDisciplinesAbstract
Commons in the New Millennium: Challenges and Adaptations
Economics
Political Science
Studying long-standing institutions for governing common pool resources at various scales can provide important lessons for governing new kinds of shared resources. In the end, institutionalizing effective processes for ongoing negotiation of the rules is more important than the rules themselves.
Cooperation and International Regimes
Economics
Political Science
Using “international [cooperation] regimes” as an example, Keohane examines how cooperation is possible in the absence of a “hegemon” to enforce compliance.
Cultural Evolution of Human Cooperation: Summaries and Findings
Biology
Anthropology
Economics
Political Science
Psychology
Innate human propensities for cooperation with strangers, shaped during the Pleistocene in response to rapidly changing environments, could have provided highly adaptive social instincts that more recently coevolved with cultural institutions; although the biological capacity for primate sociality evolved genetically, the authors propose that channeling of tribal instincts via symbol systems has involved a cultural transmission and selection that continues the evolution of cooperative human capacities at a cultural rather than genetic level — and pace.
Cultural Evolutionary Theory: A Synthetic Theory for Fragmented Disciplines
Biology
Anthropology
Cultural Evolution
Economics
Political Science
Psychology
The unique properties and probable origins of human cooperation are important problems linking cultural evolutionary theory and social psychology; the interplay of innate psychological factors, social institutions, individual preferences and population effects constitute promising fields for future interdisciplinary research.
Darwin's Blind Spot: Evolution Beyond Natural Selection
Biology
Symbiosis, the "living together of differently named organisms" is far more important in the evolution of life and the functioning of organisms and ecologies than the competition-centric views of Darwin's early defenders asserted, and may be the key driving force in the evolution of life on earth.
Darwin's Cathedral
Biology
Sociology
Wilson argues that religious systems (sets of belief and moral codes) are biological adaptations that allow individuals to act collectively and survive in distinct social and economic contexts relative to other groups.
Deindividuation and Anti-normative Behavior: A Meta Analysis
Cultural Evolution
Sociology
Psychology
Deindividuation theory is a social psychological account of the individual in the crowd that postulates that the psychological state of deindividuation brings about anti-normative and disinhibited behavior in the individual members.
Direct Economy
Business
Cultural Evolution
Technology
Economics
Information
Mathematics
Most issues related to the social, political and economic changes we are witnessing today due to the emergence and use of technologies of cooperation can be analyzed by using a matrix tracking levels of knowledge on one axis, and levels of interactivity of the other axis.
Does Market Theory Apply to Biology?
Biology
Cultural Evolution
Economics
Although significant differences remain between biological and human economic markets, such well known biological phenomena as mating markets and partner markets can be understood more fully by looking through the lens of economic models.
Drama of the Commons (Introduction)
Anthropology
Economics
Political Science
Sociology
Institutional arrangements embedded in a complex social context of rules and norms such as trust can overcome the deterioration and depletion of common-pool resources arising from individuals' rational self-interest; specific arrangements tailored to the inherent characteristics of a common-pool resource and the users can provide the optimal sustainable management of that resource.