Available Summaries

By DisciplineBy KeywordBy Author
Summary OfAuthored ByDisciplinessort iconAbstract
The Strategy of Affect: Emotions in Human Cooperation
Biology
Anthropology
Cultural Evolution
Sociology
Psychology
Emotions appear to be a key regulator of behavior in cooperative relationships. Emotions affect behavior both directly, by motivating action, and indirectly, as actors anticipate others' emotional responses.
Towards Realistic Models for Evolution of Cooperation
Biology
Cultural Evolution
Sociology
The five major approaches to answering how cooperation emerges and becomes stable in nature (Group Selection, Kinship Theory, Direct Reciprocity, Indirect Reciprocity, and Social Learning) might be improved by not presuming asexual and non-overlapping generations, simultaneous-play for every interaction, dyadic interactions, mostly predetermined and mistake-free behavior, discrete actions (cooperate or defect), and the trivial role of social structure and social learning of individuals.
Why Is Reciprocity So Rare in Social Animals? A Protestant Appeal
Biology
Cultural Evolution
Economics
Game theoretic explanations of the evolution of cooperation in humans and other animals relies on assumptions -- rational players should never cooperate, cooperative behavior is explained by direct or diffuse reciprocity, animals can do the mental bookkeeping necessary to reciprocate with multiple partners over time -- that are not always or often borne out by data, necessitating new conceptual tools.
Bandwidth and Echo: Trust, Information, And Gossip in Social Networks
Business
Sociology
Information
Network closure produces echo, gossip that reinforces dispositions rather than increasing information flow or the kind of trust that increases social capital.
Direct Economy
Business
Cultural Evolution
Technology
Economics
Information
Mathematics
Most issues related to the social, political and economic changes we are witnessing today due to the emergence and use of technologies of cooperation can be analyzed by using a matrix tracking levels of knowledge on one axis, and levels of interactivity of the other axis.
Neither Market Nor Hierarchy: Network Forms of Organization
Business
Anthropology
Network forms of organization, with reciprocal patterns of communication and exchange, are alternatives to hierarchically or market based governance structures; they are more suited to describing companies involved in an intricate latticework of collaborative ventures with other firms over extended periods of time.
Silent Theft: the Private Plunder of our Common Wealth
Business
Law
Economics
Political Science
Sociology
Without a concerted effort against it, the trend of privatization and enclosure threatens to sacrifice the environmental, political, cultural, and information commons that communities rely on for their long-term health and prosperity.
Smart Mobs: The Next Social Revolution
Business
Computer Science
Technology
Political Science
Sociology
Information
Smart mobs emerge when communication and computing technologies amplify human talents for cooperation and collective action of both beneficial and destructive kinds.
The Cornucopia of the Commons
Business
Economics
Sociology
Dan Bricklin examines ways to induce a pool of users to contribute to a commons without extra effort, using the architecture of the commons (as in Napster's default to sharing in the way download directories are available) and leveraging user's self-interest.
The Toyota Group and the Aisin Fire
Business
Economics
A flexible and coordinated response by the Toyota Group's supplier network enabled the manufacturer to rapidly restore production after a disastrous fire; the self-organized cooperation was enabled by deliberately designed practices that created dense social networks of trust and reciprocity that extended beyond Toyota's boundaries and into the companies of its network of suppliers.